Charles Céleste Hutchins was born in San Jose, California in 1976. In 1998, he graduated from Mills College in Oakland, California, where he studied electronic music with Maggi Payne. In 2005, he graduated with an MA from Wesleyan University, where he studied with Ron Kuivila and Anthony Braxton. He recently completed a PhD at the University of Birmingham, UK. He has played at venues and festivals around North America and Europe. His music has been played on European and American radio.

show more
-
22 tipped
58PPP
plays
Posts
[New Release] Meridian Drums (2013) was premièred at the Meridian Gallery in San Francisco in June 2013. It was made using SuperCollider and some anal...
Charles Céleste Hutchins is now following bioni samp
[New Release] This piece was commissioned by lesbian cock slut dot com [NSFW] When commissioned, I appealed on twitter for people to send me dick p...
[New Release] Commissioned and titled by Chrissie Caulfield. Chrissie asked me to write something with a radiation theme for her friend, who is hav...
[New Release] Airwaves is a series of tape music featuring the sounds of analog modular synthesis. It primarily uses a MOTM modular synthesizer. Becau...
[New Release] Airwaves is a series of tape music featuring the sounds of analog modular synthesis. It primarily uses a MOTM modular synthesizer. Becau...
[New Release] Airwaves is a series of tape music featuring the sounds of analog modular synthesis. It primarily uses a MOTM modular synthesizer. Becau...
[New Release] This is a live set I played at the Hundred Years Gallery in Hoxton, London in February. Originally, it was going to be a 2 hours set bro...
[New Release] I was home last year for my uncle’s funeral. I don’t have a car or even a drivers license any more, so I rode a lot of trains, especiall...
Releases by Charles Céleste Hutchins
PLAY ALL
by Charles Céleste Hutchins
Released 3 years ago
Noise, Experimental
Meridian Drums (2013) was premièred at the Meridian Gallery in San Francisco in June 2013. It was made using SuperCollider and some analogue techno synths from the days when MIDI went over MIDI cables. These were the FutureRetro 777 and a Jomox AirBase rackmounted drum machine. The piece was only semi-interactive – I cued some section changes and modified the timbre of the 777 to sound less and less like a TB303.
by Charles Céleste Hutchins
Released 3 years ago
Noise, Experimental
This piece was commissioned by lesbian cock slut dot com [NSFW] When commissioned, I appealed on twitter for people to send me dick pics. Specifically, encrypted dick picks, to highlight that various national governments are spying on our sexts. In return, I was sent two unecrpyted images and one encrypted one. The unlocked images were of a tin of spotted dick, and a rooster (known to the English as a 'cock'). The encrypted image was of the sender's 'friend, Richard.' I took these files and played them as if they were wav files. Compressed and encrypted files sound like white noise, so I took the two unencrypted images and converted them to raw image formats. I then converted those to raw audio and used them as samples. The pitches and rhythms in the piece are taken from a hymn that was popular in American Catholic churches when I was a child.
by Charles Céleste Hutchins
Released 3 years ago
Noise, Experimental
Commissioned and titled by Chrissie Caulfield. Chrissie asked me to write something with a radiation theme for her friend, who is having radiotherapy for cancer. I looked into getting a geiger counter, and even found who might lend me one, when I realised I would need a radioactive element in my studio. Also, as I was thinking of what to do with the clicks, I realised I wanted to use them for triggers, so I would need a geiger counter with a line out and everything seemed to be getting overly complex. In the end, I realised chaotic or stochastic noise would sound the same as the effect I wanted, which much less of a chance of accidentally gaining super powers (that’s what happens when you mishandle a radioactive element in your studio / workshop, right?). In the end, I made this with my MOTM modular synthesiser. The final recipient was reportedly very happy with it.
by Charles Céleste Hutchins
Released 3 years ago
Noise, Experimental
Airwaves is a series of tape music featuring the sounds of analog modular synthesis. It primarily uses a MOTM modular synthesizer. Because the sound of this synthesizer is so naturally big, pieces in this series try to give the listener some space by creating music with more air in it.
by Charles Céleste Hutchins
Released 3 years ago
Noise, Experimental
Airwaves is a series of tape music featuring the sounds of analog modular synthesis. It primarily uses a MOTM modular synthesizer. Because the sound of this synthesizer is so naturally big, pieces in this series try to give the listener some space by creating music with more air in it.
by Charles Céleste Hutchins
Released 3 years ago
Noise, Experimental
Airwaves is a series of tape music featuring the sounds of analog modular synthesis. It primarily uses a MOTM modular synthesizer. Because the sound of this synthesizer is so naturally big, pieces in this series try to give the listener some space by creating music with more air in it.
by Charles Céleste Hutchins
Released 3 years ago
Noise, Harsh Noise, Experimental
This is a live set I played at the Hundred Years Gallery in Hoxton, London in February. Originally, it was going to be a 2 hours set broadcast live on the radio, but this is what it became. This was live-patched, using my MOTM analogue modular synthesiser. Live patching is a way of performing live, where I go on with a bunch of patch cables around my neck and nothing plugged into the synth. I get sounds going as quick as I can and then change them over the course of performing. For this particular performance, I started with FM chaos. This is good, because it gives a lot of potential variety, however, if I had actually been on for the entire two hours, it would not be all that well-suited to slowly evolving drones. All the sound here is analogue, but the panning and recording is handled by a program running in SuperCollider
by Charles Céleste Hutchins
Released 3 years ago
Noise, Experimental
I was home last year for my uncle’s funeral. I don’t have a car or even a drivers license any more, so I rode a lot of trains, especially around the the South Bay Area. Silicon Valley’s trains are diesel, with real bells on them. They sound like something out of time, like our rail infrastructure is from the past even as our gadgets are pushing us into the future. I recorded the trains and bells with a Xoom recorder. Then, I analysed the spectrum of the bells and used dissonance curves to construct a tuning for FM tones modelled on the bells. I used those tones to construct a drone and then mixed in some processed versions of the train sounds. There’s also a bit of binaural beating in this piece, making it a safe, legal high. In the process of making this piece, I released a SuperCollider Quark called TuningLib, which has in it a DissonanceCurve class, useful for computing tunings based on timbre.