by Secrets of Organ Playing

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AVA191: Solutions for performing in dry acoustics Eddie wrote about dry acoustics and organ performance and wanted to get our feedback. Here's what he wrote: Dry acoustics (little, if any reverberation with full audience capacity) pose challenging interpretational problems to the performer. Most of the great organ works were composed for highly reverberant rooms such as cathedrals ranging from 3 to even 10 seconds and more. In these rooms the music is allowed to 'breathe' naturally leaving mesmerizing and long-lasting memories/impact; it is also technical-wise much easier to perform in these buildings. However, when performing in dry acoustics like most churches and even some Cathedrals in South Africa, the organist is confronted with major problems in getting across the music of the composer in a convincing, natural and coherent manner. Some 'rescue' methods to resort to may include: ♪ Shortening rests considerably at phrase-ends in order to counteract 'dead' / 'dry' breathing gabs and preventing the music to fall apart; ♪ Lengthening note values at the end of phrases to prevent the same as above; ♪ Changing / altering the music text not only to achieve a better overall musical realization (for instance, to achieve a better legato when needed), but also to ease very difficult passages technically that would otherwise be almost impossible to execute convincingly and which would be far easier to perform in live-acoustics allowing to move the hands/fingers and feet over the keyboards and pedals with more ease) (needless to say the original notation and intentions of the composer must at all times be respected with the highest integrity by the performer); ♪ Phrasing voice parts unevenly at the end of phrases, in other words, not cutting voices at the end of phrases simultaneously as required by the composer's score, but taking-off voices parts /hands/feet after another resulting in a much more natural and coherence way without dry/sec gaps in the sound and musical flow. I do not have the time here to illustrate the observations above with examples from the organ literature (I might have more time later...?); in any case, these suggestions are much easier to demonstrate than to explain in writing ...

AVA191: Solutions for performing in dry acoustics by Secrets of Organ Playing
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Eddie wrote about dry acoustics and organ performance and wanted to get our feedback. Here's what he wrote: Dry acoustics (little, if any reverberation with full audience capacity) pose challenging interpretational problems to the performer. Most of the great organ works were composed for highly reverberant rooms such as cathedrals ranging from 3 to even 10 seconds and more. In these rooms the music is allowed to 'breathe' naturally leaving mesmerizing and long-lasting memories/impact; it is also technical-wise much easier to perform in these buildings. However, when performing in dry acoustics like most churches and even some Cathedrals in South Africa, the organist is confronted with major problems in getting across the music of the composer in a convincing, natural and coherent manner. Some 'rescue' methods to resort to may include: ♪ Shortening rests considerably at phrase-ends in order to counteract 'dead' / 'dry' breathing gabs and preventing the music to fall apart; ♪ Lengthening note values at the end of phrases to prevent the same as above; ♪ Changing / altering the music text not only to achieve a better overall musical realization (for instance, to achieve a better legato when needed), but also to ease very difficult passages technically that would otherwise be almost impossible to execute convincingly and which would be far easier to perform in live-acoustics allowing to move the hands/fingers and feet over the keyboards and pedals with more ease) (needless to say the original notation and intentions of the composer must at all times be respected with the highest integrity by the performer); ♪ Phrasing voice parts unevenly at the end of phrases, in other words, not cutting voices at the end of phrases simultaneously as required by the composer's score, but taking-off voices parts /hands/feet after another resulting in a much more natural and coherence way without dry/sec gaps in the sound and musical flow. I do not have the time here to illustrate the observations above with examples from the organ literature (I might have more time later...?); in any case, these suggestions are much easier to demonstrate than to explain in writing ...
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Vidas Pinkevicius  2 years ago
 
[New Release] Eddie wrote about dry acoustics and organ performance and wanted to get our feedback. Here's what he wrote: Dry acoustics (little, if...
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